2016 Seneca 7: 8:05:35

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Team: Liar, Liar, Feet on Fire 2016 Seneca 7 overall winner.

Team: Liar, Liar, Feet on Fire 2016 Seneca 7 overall winner.

On April 24th our team “Liar, Liar, Feet on Fire” took part in my favorite race, the Seneca 7. For those of you who don’t know about this race I’ll briefly explain. The Seneca 7 is a 77.7 mile relay race around beautiful Seneca Lake in New York’s Finger Lakes region. This year 281 teams consisting of 7 runners each took part. Each runner on a team is required to run 3 times during the event. Each leg varies in distance but does not exceed 6 miles.

On the morning of the race I woke early as the sun began to rise over Seneca lake as I had an amazing view from my hotel room in Geneva, NY. Two other teammates of mine had crashed with me as well and the others scattered in hotels in the area.

The race start waves began at 0630 with the last wave going at 0900. We all met up at the starting line area around 0800 for our 0900 start (9:02:35). Aaron who was our first runner anxiously awaited the gun. A-Aron as we like to call him got the fire started quickly and the day just continued from there. We would arrive at the halfway point in the race at 12:50PM and begin our northward trek up the east side of the lake. We crossed the finish line back in Geneva at 5:08:10 encircling the lake in 8:05:35 for a daily pace of 6:14 per mile securing the 1st place overall winner of the 2016 Seneca 7.

To say we were excited might have been an understatement. I myself was personally humbled by the days event. In the end we ran hard, we had a lot of fun along the way but most importantly we ran as a team of friends who share a passion for running.

I’d like to extend a HUGE thank you to all who cheered for us, congratulated us and supported us, you all are amazing and I appreciate you!!!!!!!

A great big thank you to Seneca 7 race directors Jackie Augustine & Jeff Henderson and all who took the time to volunteer for another amazing race.

https://youtu.be/HX7ir8VQ-lE Take a peak at Ryan’s dance moves!

L-R: Ryan Heinlein, Joe Geronimo, Aaron Perry, James Wilson, Dan Cavlari, Race Directors: Jackie Augustine & Jeff Henderson, Adrian Milisavljevich & Jordan Varano.

L-R: Ryan Heinlein, Joe Geronimo, Aaron Perry, James Wilson, Dan Cavlari, Race Directors: Jackie Augustine & Jeff Henderson, Adrian Milisavljevich & Jordan Varano.

Aaron Perry handing off to James Wilson.

Aaron Perry handing off to James Wilson.

James Wilson handing off to Adrian Milisavljevich.

James Wilson handing off to Adrian Milisavljevich.

Ryan Heinlein handing off to Dan Cavalari.

Ryan Heinlein handing off to Dan Cavalari.

Jordan Varano handing off to Ryan Heinlein.

Jordan Varano handing off to Ryan Heinlein.

Joe Geronimo, left, waiting for Adrian Milisavljevich.

Joe Geronimo, left, waiting for Adrian Milisavljevich.

Ryan Heinlein having some dancing fun at one of the exchange points.

Ryan Heinlein having some dancing fun at one of the exchange points.

Dan Cavalari handing off to Aaron Perry.

Dan Cavalari handing off to Aaron Perry.

TBT: Camping

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Breakfast along Third Lake in New York's Essex Chain of Lakes in September 2015.

Breakfast along Third Lake in New York’s Essex Chain of Lakes in September 2015.

In September 2015 I had the opportunity to take a canoe/camping trip on the Essex Chain of Lakes in the Adirondacks. The camping was primitive and extremely remote. However the tranquility was undeniably amazing!

A Lake & 77.7 Miles:

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Slimmer, lighter and faster, that is how I am going into this years Seneca 7 relay race. Running at least a minute or more per mile faster than I was at this time last year and I feel stronger as well. Our team has changed a little from last year. Chuck Hein and Jeff Faherty could not join us this year due to other commitments. Taking their spots are Jordan Varano and Aaron Perry. I’ve also made some important strategy changes as well and I am extremely confident we will be a very competitive force again this year.

As I have mentioned many, many times in the past this is my favorite race. I love the race itself, the spirit, the camaraderie and the energy that teams put into this event. And as an added bonus I get to hang with some really great people from our community for a weekend.

With that said I would like to extend a huge thank you to Confluence Running of Binghamton, NY for their confidence and support of our team this year. And lastly I’d like to thank the hard running guys of our team. BAM!

Cheers!

12qzqi

New York State buys Boreas Ponds:

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New York Governor Andrew Cuomo visits Boreas Ponds in the Adirondacks which is among 69,000 acres that were acquired by the state. (I obtained this image via Google).

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo visits Boreas Ponds in the Adirondacks which is among 69,000 acres that were acquired by the state. (I obtained this image via Google).

The state paid $14.5 million for the tract, according to a deed filed April 5 in the Essex County clerk’s office. The state has yet to announce the sale, and the state Department of Environmental Conservation refused to answer questions about how public access will be managed. In the past, DEC has suggested that the public will be allowed to drive to within a mile or so of the ponds via a dirt road.
A source told the Almanack that the road to the ponds is gated (and probably will remain so for the duration of mud season) and that the ponds are still frozen. The Nature Conservancy confirmed the sale after the Almanack broke the story. Its news release linked to a video of Boreas Ponds.
The conservancy’s website also offers breathtaking photos of Boreas Ponds. The Nature Conservancy bought all 161,000 acres of the Finch, Pruyn lands in 2007. It later sold 89,000 acres to a Danish pension fund. The state owns a conservation easement on these lands that permits logging but prohibits subdivision and development.

In 2012, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that the state would purchase, in stages, 65,000 acres for the Forest Preserve, including the Essex Chain Lakes, OK Slip Falls, parts of the Hudson Gorge, and Boreas Ponds. The other properties have already been acquired.

“We are grateful to Governor Cuomo and his team for recognizing that investing in nature is an investment in New York’s future. From providing cost-effective natural water filtration and carbon storage to bolstering the tourism economy, protecting these forests and waters is an investment that will produce very big returns. We look forward to continuing to work with the state and Adirondack communities,” said Mark Tercek, president and CEO of the Nature Conservancy.

DEC and the Adirondack Park Agency now will have to decide how to manage and classify the Boreas Ponds Tract — decisions sure to be controversial.

Environmentalists want most of the tract added to the High Peaks Wilderness, whereas local officials favor a Wild Forest classification. The main difference between Wilderness and Wild Forest is that motorized uses and bicycling are banned in Wilderness Areas.

The Adirondack Council and Adirondack Mountain Club (ADK) are sponsoring a petition drive dubbed Be Wild NY to persuade the Cuomo administration to add to the High Peaks Wilderness not only the bulk of the Boreas Ponds Tract, but also the Dix Mountain Wilderness and some smaller parcels of former Finch, Pruyn lands. If this is done, the High Peaks Wilderness, already the largest Wilderness Area in the Adirondack Park, would grow to roughly 280,000 acres from 204,000 acres.

But North Hudson Supervisor Ron Moore, whose town includes Boreas Ponds, told the Adirondack Explorer last fall that he wants the tract classified as Wild Forest to facilitate public access and maximize its recreational potential. For example, he wants people to be allowed to bicycle on old logging roads in the area.

“We’re not looking to destroy the environment,” he said. “We’re looking to use an existing infrastructure of roads. We want as many people to enjoy the area as possible.”

Willie Janeway, executive director of the Adirondack Council, maintains that the Wilderness classification will attract a variety of outdoor enthusiasts, including hikers, paddlers, snowshoers, and cross-country skiers, and boost the local economy. He added that the tract could serve as a new gateway to the popular High Peaks Wilderness.

Controversy also has arisen over the status of Gulf Brook Road, a former logging road that leads to Boreas Ponds. Environmentalist groups agree that much of the road should be left open to allow the public to drive as far as LaBiere Flow, an impounded section of the Boreas River about a mile from Boreas Ponds. From there hikers could walk and canoeists could paddle and portage to the ponds.

Some wilderness advocates, such as Bill Ingersoll, publisher of the Discover the Adirondacks guidebooks, maintain that the road should be closed. This would require people to hike about seven miles to get to the ponds. In contrast, Moore contends that the public should be able to drive beyond LaBiere Flow to within three-quarters of a mile of Boreas Ponds. The disabled, he said, should be able to drive to within a quarter-mile of the ponds.

Gulf Brook Road also figures in a disagreement among environmentalists over where to draw the line between Wilderness and Wild Forest.

Protect the Adirondacks contends that Gulf Brook Road is the logical boundary. Under this scenario, it would also serve as a snowmobile trail in winter connecting North Hudson and Newcomb.

The council, ADK, and Adirondack Wild favor a plan that would extend the Wilderness boundary south of Gulf Brook almost to Blue Ridge Road, a major county highway. The snowmobile trail would then be cut between Blue Ridge Road and the Wilderness Area.

The hitch with this plan is that Gulf Brook Road would then penetrate the Wilderness Area. In order to allow people to drive to LaBiere Flow, the road would be classified as a Primitive Corridor.

Peter Bauer, executive director of Protect the Adirondacks, contends that creating a Primitive Corridor would weaken the protections for Wilderness in the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan. “If we’re going to have a motorized road, it should be in a Wild Forest Area,” he told the Explorer last fall. He also said that using the road for the snowmobile trail would obviate the cutting of thousands of trees.

Janeway counters that the Be Wild NY plan maximizes the amount of land to be classified as Wilderness and that state regulations would limit the number of trees cut for the snowmobile trail.

Other issues are whether a lodge on the south shore of Boreas Ponds, built by Finch, Pruyn as a corporate retreat, should be removed and whether a concrete dam at the foot of the ponds should maintained.

Author: Phil Brown Adirondack Explorer

http://www.adirondackexplorer.org

TBT: Gotham

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Park Ave. Viaduct Manhattan July 1993.

Park Ave. Viaduct Manhattan July 1993.

In a scene that cannot be replicated today, I was standing on the walkway of “Nick Tower” at 106th street in the Bronx. I was witnessing the tail end of the “Morning Rush” into and out of Manhattan. I was one of the signal maintainers stationed here from 0600-1400. There also was a 24 hour tower operator on duty as well. Not long after this image was captured it would be time to start the hibachi…..

Spring has Arrived: In Theory

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The calendar claims Spring has arrived, however the mercury and Mother Nature aren’t quite so convinced. To say I have cabin fever is an understatement. This morning I looked at the extended forecast only to have my hopes thwarted once again. The weather just looks terrible for the foreseeable future or at least the next 7 days.

I’m longing for the warmth of the sun, the coolness of the water and the ever quiet glide of my canoe. I hope to visit a few more remote ponds and lakes in the Adirondacks this year, return to some of my favorite places in New England but most importantly spend some quality time just paddling by myself or with my family.

Here is to hoping Spring actually does arrive.

Paddling in northern New Hampshire in one of my favorite canoes "The Old Town Pack". In 2015 I sold this light weight canoe for an even lighter weight Hornbeck canoe which weighs a total of 17 lbs.

“2014” Paddling in northern New Hampshire in one of my favorite canoes “The Old Town Pack”. In 2015 I sold this light weight canoe 33 lbs for an even lighter weight Hornbeck canoe which weighs a total of 17 lbs. I also went with a light weight carbon fiber Werner “Cyprus” paddle that only weights 23.25 oz. Photo by: Ian Clark.

History Past: 1988

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Here is an original slide from my collection dating back to 1988 of the New York Road Runners “Mile Race” in Manhattan. The clothing has come a long way since then!

New York Road Runners "Mile Race" 1988. Collection of Joe Geronimo

New York Road Runners “Mile Race” 1988. Collection of Joe Geronimo

Hyde Park New York: FDR

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This past Tuesday we made an overnight trip to Hdye Park, New York to visit the home and Presidential Library of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The National Park Service did a wonderful interpretation and the museum, library, home and grounds are just beautiful. One of the highlights in the museum is Franklin’s car complete with hand controls and a cigarette dispenser the would dispense lighted cigarettes. The Depression Era depiction was utterly amazing and sad as well. I personally am fascinated by World War Two history. We also wanted to visit Val-Kill the home of Eleanor Roosevelt but sadly it was closed the days we were there. If history is something that interests you I highly recommend a visit.

FDR's home in Hyde Park, New York.

FDR’s home in Hyde Park, New York.

The library room in FDR's home.

The library room in FDR’s home.

Music room FDR home

Music room FDR home

Dining room FDR home

Dining room FDR home

Eleanor Roosevelt's bedroom

Eleanor Roosevelt’s bedroom

Franklin and Eleanor's bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio

Franklin and Eleanor’s bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio

Franklin's boyhood bedroom

Franklin’s boyhood bedroom

"Birthing Room" where Franklin was born.

“Birthing Room” where Franklin was born.

Sarah Roosevelt's room which was Franklin's mother

Sarah Roosevelt’s room which was Franklin’s mother

In the Presidential Library sits Franklin's desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert oover's and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin's and exactly the originals.

In the Presidential Library sits Franklin’s desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert Hoover’s and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin’s and exactly the originals.

Michael in a depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two

Michael in a depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two

Depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two

Depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two

A Day that will live in infamy. Franklin's original speech originally said "World History" which he crossed out and wrote in "Infamy".

“A Day that will live in infamy” Franklin’s original speech said “World History” which he crossed out and wrote in “Infamy”.

"The Tehran Conference" On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.

“The Tehran Conference” On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.

 

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Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR's death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President's picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers - space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been "struck a physical blow," and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief "But the war's almost over!" A funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York. Funeral at Hyde Park, NY

Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR’s death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President’s picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers – space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been “struck a physical blow,” and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief “But the war’s almost over!” Funeral at Hyde Park, NY

Franklin D. Roosevelt "Funeral Train" along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.

Franklin D. Roosevelt “Funeral Train” along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt’s body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.

 

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